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Wastewater Testing - A Covid-19 pilot project in Chisasibi

July 28, 2021
Summary

Wastewater testing is a early-warning system to detect Covid-19 in communities. Chisasibi is running a pilot project this year to try out the technology in Eeyou Istchee. 

Content

Did you know that traces of the Covid-19 virus can be tracked in sewage (also known as wastewater)?

While Covid-19 is mainly a respiratory disease spread through droplets, people who are infected with the coronavirus can sometimes shed inactive traces of the virus in their stool (or poop). When flushed down the toilet, it goes into the sewer and becomes wastewater.

Covid-19 doesn’t spread through wastewater. But testing wastewater has become a useful tool for public health officials in many jurisdictions during the pandemic, helping them to detect whether the coronavirus is circulating in their communities.

That has allowed an earlier and faster response to potential infection outbreaks. 

 

Collaborative project uses innovative technology

In Eeyou Istchee, the Cree Health Board is now testing wastewater in Chisasibi  as part of a pilot project launched last spring. Like other Covid-19 test methods (a swab in the nose, spitting in a cup), wastewater screening could help public health officials better detect the presence of a virus in a community.

 

Paul Meillon

“I find wastewater surveillance a compelling approach since we are using cutting-edge science and technology that did not exist a year ago,” said Paul Meillon, a Public Health Planning, Programming and Research Officer (PPRO) who worked on developing the wastewater pilot project in Chisasibi.

“The sampling and lab techniques we are implementing will help protect the population against Covid-19, and could be expanded to other pathogens. At the same time, this project is building technical capacity within Eeyou Istchee.”

An Environmental Health Laboratory was set up at the lagoon with equipment (including autosampler machines and sampling kits) and training provided by the CNG.

The Health Board worked with local and regional partners, including the Cree Nation of Chisasibi, wastewater operators, Chisasibi Eeyou Resource and Research Institute (CERRI), and the National Microbiological Lab to develop the project.

Similar wastewater testing projects already exist in the Northwest Territories and several cities across North America, with promising results.

 

How does wastewater testing work?

Wastewater samples are collected from the sewer system  three (3) times a week, and are tested for traces of the virus. The test results are then carefully analyzed, taking the community’s context into account, to decide whether further action is needed.

For example: If traces of the virus are found in wastewater samples, it could help Public Health decide whether there’s a need for more screening tests in the community. Screening tests help identify asymptomatic infections —  people who are infected with the coronavirus but feel fine, or have such mild symptoms that they don’t feel sick enough to go get tested.

If traces of the virus are found in wastewater samples, it could be an early sign that an outbreak is starting. This “early warning system” can help guide recommendations to scale down or increase protective measures — such as wearing masks more carefully, getting vaccinated, and or reducing gatherings.

Knowing whether the coronavirus is present in a community helps the Infectious Disease team react earlier to reduce the potential spread of infection. This, in turn, could save some people from ever getting sick.

 

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    Man sitting holding vial in his hand
    Caption
    Wastewater samples are processed at the Environmental Health laboratory in Chisasibi.
    Credit
    Photo: Reggie Tomatuk
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    Testing wastewater samples for Covid-19
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    Wastewater samples are collected three times a week for testing.
    Credit
    Photo: Reggie Tomatuk
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    Man fills out information about sample
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    Wastewater samples are processed at the Environmental Health laboratory in Chisasibi.
    Credit
    Photo: Reggie Tomatuk
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    Wastewater testing team in Chisasibi
    Caption
    The wastewater testing pilot project in Chisasibi is an opportunity for local skill and knowledge development.
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    Lab workers working in the lab
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    The Environmental Science lab is located at the lagoon in Chisasibi.
    Credit
    Photo: Reggie Tomatuk

Why is wastewater testing so useful?

Testing wastewater regularly for Covid-19 is one way to know whether the virus is circulating in a community. It’s also a way to reassure that the virus is not present in a community. Either way, wastewater testing strengthens the community safety net against Covid-19.

As wastewater testing is established in Eeyou Istchee, it can become an additional layer of protection that works with other measures in place (vaccination, masking, and individual screening tests).

 

Ribbon-cutting ceremony

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    Ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Environmental Health laboratory in Chisasibi.
    Caption
    A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held at the Environmental Health laboratory on Wednesday, July 28, 2021.
    Credit
    Photo: Gerardo Salazar
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    Ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Environmental Health laboratory in Chisasibi.
    Caption
    Chisasibi Deputy Chief Paula Napash (right), CBHSSJB Board Chair Bertie Wapachee (centre) and George Diamond (left).
    Credit
    Photo: Gerardo Salazar
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    Ribbon is cut with scissors
    Credit
    Photo: Gerardo Salazar
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    Woman cuts ribbon
    Credit
    Photo: Gerardo Salazar
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    Group standing in circle
    Credit
    Photo: Gerardo Salazar
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    Woman standing in front of entrance
    Credit
    Photo: Gerardo Salazar
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    Group in circle with heads bowed
    Credit
    Photo: Gerardo Salazar
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    Woman with her back to the camera and 2 others in prayer
    Credit
    Photo: Gerardo Salazar
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    Man addresses group of people
    Credit
    Photo: Gerardo Salazar
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    Man holding vial of liquid
    Credit
    Photo: Gerardo Salazar

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