Prevalence of Diabetes and Diabetes-related Complications in First Nations Communities in Northern Quebec (Eeyou Istchee), Canada

Wed, 10/10/2012 - 13:48 -- admin
TitlePrevalence of Diabetes and Diabetes-related Complications in First Nations Communities in Northern Quebec (Eeyou Istchee), Canada
Publication TypeResearch
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsDannenbaum DA, Kuzmina E, Lejeune P, Torrie J, Gangbe M
Abstract

Objective: This study presents an overview of the epidemiology and clinical management of diabetes in the Cree population of Eeyou Istchee, Eastern James Bay, Quebec, Canada. Methods: This descriptive study is based on data from the Cree Diabetes Information System, a unique diabetes management and surveillance system in the region that provides demographic and clinical data on physician-diagnosed cases of type 1 and 2 diabetes among the Cree of Eastern James Bay. Results: In July 2005, 1363 Cree were living with physician-diagnosed diabetes in Eeyou Istchee (17.3% crude prevalence age ≥20 years). The age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes among the Cree population (age ≥20 years) was 22.4%, 3.5 times higher than the Quebec age-adjusted diabetes prevalence of 6.4% (2003–2004). The crude prevalence of diabetes in Eeyou Istchee has increased by 330% in the past 16 years, from 5.2% of Cree adults (age ≥20 years) in 1989 to 17.3%. Those age <40 years account for 27.4% of all cases of diabetes in Eeyou Istchee, and 34.3% of Cree with diabetes have been diagnosed in the past 5 years. Target glycosylated hemoglobin levels (≤7%) were achieved by 44.5% of patients; 42.9 and 51.3% achieved target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (≤2.50 mmol/L) and blood pressure (≤130/80 mm Hg)levels, respectively. Nonetheless, 53.3% already have documented diabetic nephropathy, 12.5% have retinopathy, 9.5% have neuropathy and 12.6% have macrovascular disease. Conclusion: The increasing numbers of young adults with newly diagnosed diabetes in the Cree region of Eeyou Istchee and the high rates of existing diabetic nephropathy are alarming health concerns from clinical and public health perspectives.

URLhttp://www.diabetes.ca/documents/for-professionals/CJD--March_2008--Dannenbaum,_D.pdf