High Rates of Infant Macrosomia: A Comparison of a Canadian Native and a Non-Native Population

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TitleHigh Rates of Infant Macrosomia: A Comparison of a Canadian Native and a Non-Native Population
Publication TypeResearch
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsRodrigues S, Dr Robinson EJ, Kramer MS
Corporate Authorsnutrition.org
Abstract

The Cree of James Bay have the highest ever reported mean birth weight and a high prevalence of infant macrosomia (higher than normal birth weight). This study was designed to examine independent risk factors for infant macrosomia among the Cree, to compare these to risk factors among non-Native Canadians and to determine if ethnic differences persist after adjusting for differences in the distribution of other risk factors. Macrosomia was defined as birth weight >90th percentile for gestational age of a reference population. Independent determinants of macrosomia were examined in 385 Cree and 5644 non-Native women. The potential effect of ethnicity (Cree vs. non-Native) was determined after statistically adjusting for age, parity, pregravid weight, height, net rate of weight gain, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and smoking status.

URLhttp://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/reprint/130/4/806?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&author1=rodrigues&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&sortspec=relevance&volume=130&firstpage=806&resourcetype=HWCIT
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