Investigating wild berries as a dietary approach to reducing the formation of advanced glycation endproducts: chemical correlates of in vitro antiglycation activity.

Thu, 10/22/2015 - 11:41 -- Tracy Wysote
TitleInvestigating wild berries as a dietary approach to reducing the formation of advanced glycation endproducts: chemical correlates of in vitro antiglycation activity.
Publication TypeResearch
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsHarris CS, Cuerrier A, Lamont E, Haddad PS, Arnason JT, Bennett SAL, Johns T
KeywordsAnthocyanins, Anti Diabetic Plant Project, Antioxidants, Diet, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Free Radical Scavengers, Fruit, Functional Food, Glycosylation End Products, Advanced, Humans, Phenols, Plant Extracts, Plants, Edible
Abstract

Evidence supports the health promoting benefits of berries, particularly with regard to the prevention and management of chronic diseases such cardio- and cerebrovascular disease, diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. Two related pathophysiological features common to many of these conditions are oxidative stress and the accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Whereas antioxidant properties are well-established in several species of berries and are believed central to their protective mechanisms, few studies have investigated the effects of berries on AGE formation. Here, employing a series of complementary in vitro assays, we evaluated a collection of wild berry extracts for 1) inhibitory effects on fluorescent-AGE and Nε- (carboxymethyl)lysine-albumin adduct formation, 2) radical scavenging activity and 3) total phenolic and anthocyanin content. All samples reduced AGE formation in a concentration-dependent manner that correlated positively with each extract's total phenolic content and, to a lesser degree, total anthocyanin content. Inhibition of AGE formation was similarly related to radical scavenging activities. Adding antiglycation activity to the list of established functional properties ascribed to berries and their phenolic metabolites, our data provide further insight into the active compounds and protective mechanisms through which berry consumption may aid in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases associated with AGE accumulation and toxicity. As widely available, safe and nutritious foods, berries represent a promising dietary intervention worthy of further investigation.

DOI10.1007/s11130-014-0403-3
PubMed ID24448675
PubMed Central IDPMC3930840
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