2016 Training Program on Food Handling Best Practices for Cree Traditional and Store-bought Foods

Thu, 01/28/2016 - 08:53 -- Iain Cook
Title2016 Training Program on Food Handling Best Practices for Cree Traditional and Store-bought Foods
Publication TypeHealth Promotion
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsCree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay(CBHSSJB)
Keywordseeyou meechim, food safety, Traditional foods
Abstract

Methods

5 day Workshop-Conference for Safe handling of Wild Meats

Goal:

  •  To provide updated information sessions on safe food handling on bush meats
  •  To increase awareness on Food safety, sanitation and Hygiene issues
  •  To provide guidelines for recommended best practices for hunting and bush meat manipulations from the bush to the table
  •  To explore the nutritional benefits of Bush Meats and the promotion of traditional Cree diets
  •  To address the issues of contaminants of the environment and animals on our territory
  •  To provide a provincially recognized Food Safety accreditation for food handlers
  •  To share Cree cooking preparation and cooking techniques

Reason:

  •  To ensure the safety and quality of wild meats harvested by Cree hunters for the all CBHSSJB patients and clients who eat at our foodservices , as well as clients at Elder Home and Childcare Centers
  •  To raise awareness for Food Safety issues for food handlers of both bush meats and commercially-bought foods.
  •  To answer to community needs and requests for food safety and keeping Cree foods safe for our communities.
  •  To answer to community needs for alleviating Food Insecurity.

Target groups:

  • Chisasibi Hospital food services employees and support staff, MSDC food service employees and support staff, Cree Trappers
  • Association hunters, Youth Healing Service Centers hunters, community food handlers (restaurants, caterers, feast organisers and food handlers, institutional foodservices...), and to all community members who share an interest in the food safety of the animals they harvest.
Health Topics: